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Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 11
Gender Justice in Digital Realms
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Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 1 + Opening circle: The Library as a Site of Initiation
Opening circle: The Library as a Site of Initiation
November 22, 2023
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Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 1 + Postcards from a Progressive Present
Postcards from a Progressive Present
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Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Opening Ceremony
Opening Ceremony: Awakening the Future
April 9, 2024
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Postcards from a Progressive Present
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Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 1
Dig.IT.all Kinship: Foundations of Digital Relations
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Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 1 + Foundations of Afrocentrism and Cultural Architecture
Foundations of Afrocentrism and Cultural Architecture
July 2, 2024
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Welcome to 'Cultural Architecture: Building Afrocentric Realities.' I'm Anwulika Okonjo, and together, we will explore the rich tapestry of African and Afro-diasporic cultures and how these can be the foundation for constructing empowering social realities. This course will challenge you to think critically about the structures we live in and the world we aspire to create.

Introduction to Cultural Architecture & World-Building

Let's begin by defining Cultural Architecture. This concept extends beyond physical spaces and aesthetics—It's more than buildings; it's the blueprint for our social framework. It involves the shaping of social structures based on the cultural influences, social norms and ideologies of our societies. It’s about crafting systems, institutions, and environments that reflect and support the identities and values of a community. As cultural architects, our task is to consciously design these elements and sustainable ecosystems that honour our past while paving the way for a world where our knowledge thrives locally and globally.

"Cultural architecture is foundational. It lays the groundwork for how societies function, influencing everything from laws and education systems to urban planning and media representation.

[Pop-up: "Key Concept: Cultural Architecture: The strategic design of social structures that reflect and support collective identities, values and aspirations."] 

What is World-Building?

In close association with cultural architecture is the concept of world-building. While cultural architecture gives us the frameworks, world-building is the process by which we populate these frameworks. 

Often associated with fiction, such literary and cinematic creations, world-building in our context extends into real life. Here, we harness it as a transformative tool for social change.

 We define world-building as the detailed crafting of societal narratives that can profoundly influence how individuals and communities perceive and interact with the world around them, including how they understand themselves and their potential. 

World-building is dynamic and ongoing. It is about filling the structures created by cultural architecture with life and meaning—through arts, laws, education, and daily social interactions. It’s how cultural values are expressed and sustained in practical, everyday contexts."

[Pop-up: "Key Concept: World-Building - The crafting of societal narratives that shape perceptions and interactions within cultural frameworks.]"]

Consider how the films you watch, the stories you read, and the art you experience influence your perceptions of reality. Now imagine applying that same concept to societal design—where every element of society reflects deep-rooted collective values.  Our narratives shape our understanding of history, of present possibilities, and future trajectories.

How Cultural Architecture and World-Building Work Together

Though distinct, cultural architecture and world-building are deeply interconnected. Think of cultural architecture as constructing the theatre, while world-building is about writing the play that unfolds within it. Both are necessary to create a full, vibrant cultural expression that can influence and inspire both the present and future generations.

For example, if we design an educational system (cultural architecture) that incorporates Afrocentric histories and philosophies, the content taught within this system (world-building) can transform students' understanding of their heritage and identity, empowering them to enact change in their communities. The way in which that education system is designed – the principles, perspectives and practices that inform it – are just as important as the content the students learn. 

Engaged Citizenship and the Social Imaginary

"In 1948, Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti – a Nigerian educator, political campaigner, suffragist, and women's rights activist - delivered a speech to a youth patriotic society in Lagos, emphasising the importance of engaged citizenship. She stated: 'Citizenship simply means the right of being a citizen, but it carries a big responsibility with it... It is when you make your existence felt, and contribute to the welfare and progress of Lagos, that you are recognized as its citizen.' This idea extends beyond individual enjoyment to contributing to societal progress."

[Pop-up: 'Key Quote: "It is when you make your existence felt, and contribute to the welfare and progress of society that you are recognized as its citizen." - Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti']

Seeing ourselves as cultural architects or world-builders is the first step in the practice of engaged citizenship. “Making your existence felt”. Take a second to let that sink in – isn’t it empowering to know that your existence, your voice, your contributions matter? Engaged citizenship is about being intentional in how we reclaim that power and direct our collective future. In a world which is inundated with information about challenges that seem to be insurmountable, it can be easy to lapse into a passive or apathetic state. One may also have a tendency to feel that as long as our individual material needs are being met, that we are good. However, Ransome-Kuti’s quote reminds us of two things: 

  1. Society is about more than just institutions and material structures. It includes the values, beliefs, attitudes, and practices that underpin how we operate collectively, including who has power and how people interact with each other.
  2. The welfare and progress of the entire society are essential to both our individual and collective wellbeing. To be an engaged citizen, a cultural architect, a world-builder, is to care for others. 

African philosophies and practices can guide our understanding of engaged citizenship. For example, Ubuntu, an South African philosophy emphasising community and interdependence, enshrines the idea that our humanity is established through engagement, cooperation and mutual support with others.[Pop-up: 'Key Concept: Ubuntu - "A person is a person through other people" - A philosophy emphasising interdependence and collective well-being.']The need for engaged citizenship is particularly critical for people of African descent. Legacies of colonialism, enslavement, imperialism and other mechanisms have worked to suppress African agency and self-determination. Engaged citizenship calls for us to be intentional about how we interact with existing systems and structures. Afrocentric world-building equips us to challenge these legacies, reclaim our narratives, reshape our realities, and create spaces reflective of our values and aspirations.

World-Building in Action

Let's dissect how world-building plays out in everyday life: 

Individual Choices: Your personal decisions – what you wear, what you eat, where you live – reflect and shape your identity and values. Example: Choosing to wear clothes by African designers supports local industries and promotes cultural pride. This is a form of world-building, where you're helping to construct a world that values and sustains local craftsmanship.

[Pop-up: Interactive Poll 'Which aspect of your daily life reflects your cultural identity and value systems the most? Choices: Clothing, Food, Media Consumption, Community Engagement.']

Community Level: How we use public spaces—parks that host local music festivals, schools that teach local languages and histories, and community centres with culturally relevant programs are forms of world-building.

The same applies to urban design, technology and governance. Imagine public art that tells the history of the land, buildings designed in African styles, and technology platforms that centre African voices.

Global Scale: On a global scale, through diplomacy, international trade, and other exchanges, African nations can construct a world stage where their perspectives and innovations are integral. People of African descent in the diaspora promoting internationalism, reciprocity and finding ways to uplift and sustain their unique backgrounds even in contexts where they are not the dominant population. This kind of world-building not only elevates the  ideas of people of African descent, but also fosters a more inclusive and equitable global community.

The Role of Cultural Architecture in Today's Society

As cultural architects, you are tasked with understanding these forces and using them to inform your everyday actions and to design better systems. 

In a globalised world, cultural architecture isn't just relevant; it's vital. It asks us to rethink the roles our heritage can play. How do we use it to reshape dominant narratives? At home, it means recognizing the value of indigenous knowledge and ensuring it drives innovation across sectors.

What are some areas in your community where you can see yourself as a cultural architect?

[Pop-up question: What are some areas in your community where you can see yourself as a cultural architect?]

Challenges and Opportunities

Colonialism, cultural erasure, and economic power imbalances can hinder world-building efforts. Yet, these also fuel our resilience. We must be strategic, finding ways to integrate our values into existing structures and create new ones.

As we close this lesson, consider how you can apply the principles of cultural architecture and world-building in your daily life. How will you engage as a citizen in shaping the spaces and narratives around you? Each of us carries an imprint of our ancestors and carries the seeds for the future we long for.  Remember, every small action contributes to a larger narrative. How will you use this power?  

Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 2 + Sobonfu, Keeper of the Rituals
Sobonfu, Keeper of the Rituals
November 23, 2023
4
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Completed
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 2 + Life-affirming Infrastructures
Life-affirming Infrastructures
4
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Completed
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 2
Resounding Voices: Revolutionary Expressions in Art and Music
April 17, 2024
4
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Completed
[test] Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 2 + Life-affirming Infrastructures Copy
Life-affirming Infrastructures
4
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Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 2
Cykofa Narration
4
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Completed
Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 2 + Discovering Your Role in the Pan-African Renaissance [Live Class]
Discovering Your Role in the Pan-African Renaissance [Live Class]
July 4, 2024
4
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Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 3 + Intimacy as A Spiritual Practice
Intimacy as A Spiritual Practice
November 29, 2023
4
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Completed
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 3 + Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
4
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Completed
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 3
Pan-African Mythologies and the Matriarchal Spirit
April 17, 2024
4
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Completed
[test] Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 3 + Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves Copy
Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
4
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Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 3
Algorithms, Power and Race
4
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Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 3 + Power and Cultural Confidence
Power and Cultural Confidence
July 9, 2024
4
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What shapes our beliefs, values, and perceptions of the world? 

In this lesson, we delve into the concept of cultural hegemony, introduced by Italian philosopher Antonio Gramsci, which reveals how state power and cultural forces collaborate to perpetuate dominance - imposing certain norms and values to the detriment, and sometimes erasure, of diverse cultures and ideas. This profound force can often leave people feeling powerless and confined to a narrow set of possibilities. 

But hegemony isn't invincible. By understanding its roots and mechanisms, we can begin to dismantle it and pave the way for transformation through cultural confidence. 

[Pop-up: 'Cultural Hegemony: A concept developed by Antonio Gramsci, referring to the dominance of one social group over others, maintained through cultural norms and institutions.']

Understanding Cultural Hegemony 

Cultural hegemony functions by standardising a specific set of norms and values across societies. For Africans and the diaspora, the legacies of colonialism and slavery have embedded Eurocentric standards deeply within our institutions and societal fabric, marginalising our native cultures, histories, and philosophies."

In 1903, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, an American sociologist, socialist, historian, and Pan-Africanist civil rights activist, came up with the concept of 'double consciousness', which vividly captures the internal conflict faced by African descendants, striving to maintain authenticity while navigating a predominantly European-influenced world.

He described it as a sensation of always looking at one's self through the eyes of a society that devalues Africanness. This dual awareness—the sense of 'twoness,' as Du Bois puts it—forces African Americans to constantly negotiate between their African heritage and the imposed Western cultural standards.

[Visuals: quotes from W.E.B. Du Bois’s writings.]

The mechanisms of dominance are not only overt but also covert, influencing international norms and development policies that often prioritise Western approaches. This structural hegemony extends into media and education, where narratives uphold certain power dynamics, subtly shaping public opinion and self-perception among African communities.

Internalised oppression, a direct result of cultural hegemony, diminishes self-esteem and distorts identities, leading to a diminished sense of agency among individuals in African and diasporic communities. Frantz Fanon, in works like 'Black Skin, White Masks' and 'The Wretched of the Earth,' discusses how this form of control is psychological, shaping how individuals perceive themselves and their cultures.

Cultural hegemony, racism, and internalised oppression often operate in a vicious cycle, reinforcing each other to maintain power imbalances and justify the dominance of certain groups over others.  Racism, a system of prejudice and discrimination based on race, provides the ideological framework for this dominance. It creates a hierarchy where certain racial groups are seen as superior, while others are deemed inferior.

Cultural hegemony then works to normalise and legitimise this hierarchy by embedding racist ideas and values into the dominant culture's norms, institutions, and everyday practices. These ideas can manifest in various ways, from media representations that perpetuate stereotypes to educational systems that erase or distort the histories and contributions of marginalised groups.

Internalised oppression, the process by which individuals from marginalised groups internalise and accept the negative stereotypes and beliefs about their own group, further reinforces this cycle. It can manifest as self-doubt, shame, and a sense of inferiority, making it difficult for individuals to challenge the status quo and assert their own agency.

Have there been times when you've felt a disconnect or even a sense of shame towards certain aspects of your own culture? Or perhaps you've witnessed others expressing similar sentiments towards their own or another culture? 

Reclaiming Agency: Afrocentricity 

To combat these effects, we turn to Afrocentricity and Afrocentrism, frameworks that call for us to reclaim our agency, redefine power, and reshape our own narratives. These approaches place the perspectives, experiences, and contributions of African peoples at the core of analysis and world-building, challenging the marginalisation of African and global black histories and narratives.

[Pop-up: 'Afrocentrism: A framework that places African perspectives and histories at the core of discussions and analyses concerning African peoples and their diasporas.']

The term "Afrocentric" first gained prominence in the work of Kwame Nkrumah. In response to centuries of European and scholars from other parts of the world opining about Africans and black people, he insisted that people of African descent had to  interpret their own histories and social and cultural institutions. This is ultimately about reclaiming agency, autonomy, and power. A great example of this is a seminal work ‘I Write What I Like’, by the late South African anti-apartheid activist, Steve Biko. 

Molefi Asante emphasised the importance of Afrocentricity not just as a cultural movement but as a theory of agency that positions African and black people as active creators of their realities.

Cultivating Cultural Confidence

Cultural confidence is not just a sentiment; it's an active practice of embracing and valuing our unique identities, traditions, and expressions. It is about acknowledging the enduring strength and wisdom of our ancestors and leveraging this rich heritage to influence and shape the modern world.

As our ancestors moved—whether through migration or the force of the transatlantic slave trade—our cultural identities journeyed with them, planting seeds of African heritage across the globe. This dispersion has given rise to vibrant Afro-diasporic communities such as Afro-Cubans, African-Americans, and Afropeans, each adapting their heritage to their new contexts and evolving in unique ways.

Achille Mbembe challenges us to see this not as a loss but as a dynamic evolution—urging us not to return to an 'authentic' past but to create new ways of being that draw strength from our traditions. This is the essence of cultural confidence: crafting a future that is deeply rooted yet boldly forward-looking.

[Quote Pop-up: Achille Mbembe - "The task is not to return to some authentic African past, but to create new ways of being and thinking that are rooted in our own traditions and experiences." (Critique of Black Reason)]

Marcus Garvey's movement in early 20th-century America exemplifies this. He rallied for economic independence and cultural pride, laying a foundation for civil rights activism and emphasising the importance of Africans and their descendants building their own communities, industries, and educational systems.

Today, we see cultural confidence manifested in the revival of African languages in educational systems, the global influence of Afrobeat music, and the incorporation of African aesthetics into fashion and the arts, all of which assert our cultural presence on the world stage.

Here are some ways we can cultivate cultural confidence: [don’t read]

  • Embrace Your Heritage: Deepen your knowledge of your cultural roots, history, traditions, and language. This can involve researching your ancestry, engaging with elders and community members, and participating in cultural practices.
  • Practice Self-Affirmation: Affirm your worth and celebrate your unique gifts and talents. Practise positive self-talk and challenge any internalised negative messages about your culture or identity.
  • Build Community: Surround yourself with people who support and celebrate your cultural identity. Participate in cultural organisations and events to connect with others who share your values and aspirations.
  • Seek Out Diverse Perspectives: Engage with people from different backgrounds and cultures, learning from their experiences and perspectives. This can help broaden your understanding of the world and challenge the dominant narratives you've been exposed to.
  • Engage in Creative Expression: Use art, music, fashion, dance, or other forms of creative expression to connect with your cultural heritage and share your unique perspective with the world.
  • Advocate for Inclusive Education, Frameworks and Voices: Push for curricula that reflect the diversity of human experiences and histories. Support educational initiatives that centre marginalised voices and challenge Eurocentric perspectives.
  • Challenge Racist and Discriminatory Practices: Speak out against racism, discrimination, and prejudice wherever you encounter them. Hold institutions and individuals accountable for perpetuating harmful stereotypes and systems of oppression.

Can you think of any other ways to build cultural confidence?

What are some of the barriers that prevent people from building cultural confidence and power? What are some ways to overcome them? 

Thank you for joining me today. I hope this discussion inspires you to think deeply about the power of your cultural identity and how it can be harnessed to reshape not only your own worldview but also the societies we live in. In our next lesson, we'll explore practical strategies for applying these concepts in various aspects of personal and professional life.

Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 4 + The Ash Circle of Intimacy: Conflict Resolution as Ceremony
The Ash Circle of Intimacy: Conflict Resolution as Ceremony
November 16, 2023
4
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Completed
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 4 + Imagining Otherwise: Countering Carceral Fictions with Abolitionist Realities
Imagining Otherwise: Countering Carceral Fictions with Abolitionist Realities
4
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Completed
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 4
Humanity Beyond Binaries
April 24, 2024
4
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Completed
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 4
Artificial Intelligence, Art & Social Inquiry
4
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Completed
Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 4 + Honing Your Glitch
Honing Your Glitch [Live Class]
July 11, 2024
4
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Completed
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Mythmaking and The Poetics of African Spirituality
Mythmaking and The Poetics of African Spirituality
4
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Completed
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 5 + Approximating Realities: Shifting Power and Territories Through Fiction
Approximating Realities: Shifting Power and Territories Through Fiction
4
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Completed
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 5
Crafting Futures: African-Descendant Women as Architects of Change
May 1, 2024
4
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Completed
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 5
human Rights & Digital Justice
4
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Completed
Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 5 + Cultivating Afrocentric Sensibilities
Cultivating Afrocentric Sensibilities
July 16, 2024
4
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Completed
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 6 + Beyond What is Known: Embracing Uncertainty and Redefining Value in an Ever-changing World
Beyond What is Known: Embracing Uncertainty and Redefining Value in an Ever-changing World
4
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Completed
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 6
African Traditions of Sex and Sexualities
May 8, 2024
4
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Completed
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 6
Building Diasporic Connections
4
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Completed
Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 6 + Towards Plurality: Expanding Afrocentric Influence Globally
Towards Plurality: Expanding Afrocentric Influence Globally
July 2, 2024
4
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Completed
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 7
Writing Ourselves: The Power of Storytelling
May 15, 2024
4
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Completed
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 7
Building an Afro-feminist Internet
4
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Completed
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 8
Inscribed Identities: Exploring Body Markings and Expression in African Women's Lives
May 22, 2024
4
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Completed
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 8
Ethical Design
4
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Completed
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 9
Unravelling Fear and African Feminist Imagination
May 22, 2024
4
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Completed
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 9
Workshop: African Imagination and Technology Design
4
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Completed
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 10
Fostering Wellness and Resilience in Women
May 29, 2024
4
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Completed
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 10
Care & Community in Digital Interfaces
4
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Completed
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 11
Re-creating Ourselves Workshop
May 29, 2024
4
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Completed
65bb8d0a05487d6757e83123
Opening circle: The Library as a Site of Initiation
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 1 + Opening circle: The Library as a Site of Initiation
65bb8d0a05487d6757e831e0
Postcards from a Progressive Present
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 1 + Postcards from a Progressive Present
65deedb761b22f2fb215546e
Opening Ceremony: Awakening the Future
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Opening Ceremony
6603b321feac2d83061335b5
Dig.IT.all Kinship: Foundations of Digital Relations
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 1
65bb8d0a05487d6757e83124
Sobonfu, Keeper of the Rituals
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 2 + Sobonfu, Keeper of the Rituals
65bb8d0a05487d6757e831e1
Life-affirming Infrastructures
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 2 + Life-affirming Infrastructures
65eae7b5ca5f25e8afb9a32c
Resounding Voices: Revolutionary Expressions in Art and Music
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 2
668fb6ef0f851e131fc256ce
Discovering Your Role in the Pan-African Renaissance [Live Class]
Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 2 + Discovering Your Role in the Pan-African Renaissance [Live Class]
65bb8d0a05487d6757e83125
Intimacy as A Spiritual Practice
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 3 + Intimacy as A Spiritual Practice
65bb8d0a05487d6757e831e2
Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 3 + Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
65eb2589ca86fd09f2efd578
Pan-African Mythologies and the Matriarchal Spirit
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 3
65bb8d0a05487d6757e831e2
Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
[test] Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 3 + Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves Copy
6603b4d43c0be2ae5b87553f
Algorithms, Power and Race
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 3
65bb8d0a05487d6757e83126
The Ash Circle of Intimacy: Conflict Resolution as Ceremony
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 4 + The Ash Circle of Intimacy: Conflict Resolution as Ceremony
65bb8d0a05487d6757e831e3
Imagining Otherwise: Countering Carceral Fictions with Abolitionist Realities
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 4 + Imagining Otherwise: Countering Carceral Fictions with Abolitionist Realities
65eb25de34852ae8ee33f0ee
Humanity Beyond Binaries
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 4
6603b5ff3c0be2ae5b8860f4
Artificial Intelligence, Art & Social Inquiry
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 4
65bb8d0a05487d6757e831a1
Mythmaking and The Poetics of African Spirituality
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Mythmaking and The Poetics of African Spirituality
65bb8d0a05487d6757e831e4
Approximating Realities: Shifting Power and Territories Through Fiction
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 5 + Approximating Realities: Shifting Power and Territories Through Fiction
65deee28ef10fb019f91df2c
Crafting Futures: African-Descendant Women as Architects of Change
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 5
6603b6ab2e488673fd6490d2
human Rights & Digital Justice
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 5
65bb8d0a05487d6757e831e5
Beyond What is Known: Embracing Uncertainty and Redefining Value in an Ever-changing World
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 6 + Beyond What is Known: Embracing Uncertainty and Redefining Value in an Ever-changing World
65eb264b0c045d39e791656e
African Traditions of Sex and Sexualities
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 6
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Building Diasporic Connections
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 6
65eb26b4f8d477123b74256a
Writing Ourselves: The Power of Storytelling
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 7
6603b7e7c908fcf24a2025e7
Building an Afro-feminist Internet
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 7
65eb26e74e2305e8073e5206
Inscribed Identities: Exploring Body Markings and Expression in African Women's Lives
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 8
65eb261ede95eaac2b5631ae
Unravelling Fear and African Feminist Imagination
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 9
6603b8f9feac2d8306186ebe
Workshop: African Imagination and Technology Design
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 9
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Fostering Wellness and Resilience in Women
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 10
6603b9bfa8c60b1936ee12cf
Care & Community in Digital Interfaces
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 10
65eb2748c6054bd2070bc620
Re-creating Ourselves Workshop
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 11
65bb8d0a05487d6757e83123
Opening circle: The Library as a Site of Initiation
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 1 + Opening circle: The Library as a Site of Initiation
65bb8d0a05487d6757e831e0
Postcards from a Progressive Present
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 1 + Postcards from a Progressive Present
65deedb761b22f2fb215546e
Opening Ceremony: Awakening the Future
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Opening Ceremony
6603b321feac2d83061335b5
Dig.IT.all Kinship: Foundations of Digital Relations
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 1
65bb8d0a05487d6757e83124
Sobonfu, Keeper of the Rituals
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 2 + Sobonfu, Keeper of the Rituals
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Life-affirming Infrastructures
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 2 + Life-affirming Infrastructures
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Resounding Voices: Revolutionary Expressions in Art and Music
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 2
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Discovering Your Role in the Pan-African Renaissance [Live Class]
Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 2 + Discovering Your Role in the Pan-African Renaissance [Live Class]
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Intimacy as A Spiritual Practice
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 3 + Intimacy as A Spiritual Practice
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Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 3 + Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
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Pan-African Mythologies and the Matriarchal Spirit
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 3
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Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
[test] Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 3 + Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves Copy
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Algorithms, Power and Race
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 3
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The Ash Circle of Intimacy: Conflict Resolution as Ceremony
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 4 + The Ash Circle of Intimacy: Conflict Resolution as Ceremony
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Imagining Otherwise: Countering Carceral Fictions with Abolitionist Realities
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 4 + Imagining Otherwise: Countering Carceral Fictions with Abolitionist Realities
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Humanity Beyond Binaries
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 4
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Artificial Intelligence, Art & Social Inquiry
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 4
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Mythmaking and The Poetics of African Spirituality
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Mythmaking and The Poetics of African Spirituality
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Approximating Realities: Shifting Power and Territories Through Fiction
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 5 + Approximating Realities: Shifting Power and Territories Through Fiction
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Crafting Futures: African-Descendant Women as Architects of Change
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 5
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human Rights & Digital Justice
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 5
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Beyond What is Known: Embracing Uncertainty and Redefining Value in an Ever-changing World
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 6 + Beyond What is Known: Embracing Uncertainty and Redefining Value in an Ever-changing World
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African Traditions of Sex and Sexualities
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 6
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Building Diasporic Connections
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 6
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Writing Ourselves: The Power of Storytelling
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 7
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Building an Afro-feminist Internet
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 7
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Inscribed Identities: Exploring Body Markings and Expression in African Women's Lives
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 8
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Unravelling Fear and African Feminist Imagination
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 9
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Workshop: African Imagination and Technology Design
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 9
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Fostering Wellness and Resilience in Women
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 10
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Care & Community in Digital Interfaces
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 10
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Re-creating Ourselves Workshop
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 11
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 11
Gender Justice in Digital Realms
Chenai provides invaluable insights into public interest policy, civil society engagement, and the nuanced impacts of technology on women and gender-diverse individuals. Through this session, participants will understand the transformative potential of different types of interventions to support and sustain African feminist movements, leading the charge towards a more equitable and inclusive digital future.
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 1 + Opening circle: The Library as a Site of Initiation
Opening circle: The Library as a Site of Initiation
November 22, 2023
In the first part of the course, we will ignite the first flames of our study circle by delving into the notion of 'initiation' in relation to epistemology while pushing the boundaries of what is considered real, true or a valid source of knowledge. A book and an unborn child can be altars of knowledge just like reading and ritual-making can be knowledge activation methods and practices.
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 1 + Postcards from a Progressive Present
Postcards from a Progressive Present
In this interactive session we will travel in time to any given moment in the future we desire for our selves, our land and our people. We will achieve this by first grounding ourselves in our bodies and in space and then reflecting on a number of questions that progress us into the energy of our desired future. Questions like who is the freest version of myself, what is my vision of communal love, what does it feel like to exist in a space that is thriving in abundance. We will paint a picture of the highest versions of our selves living in the highest versions of our communities and invite our selves in to inhabit this space. From here we will write and send postcards with messages of hope, joy, encouragement and support to our selves and our loved ones living in the reality of here and now. In this way we become emissaries of hope, astronauts voyaging into the dream space and returning with the tools needed for us to bring it to fruition.
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Opening Ceremony
Opening Ceremony: Awakening the Future
April 9, 2024
We set the stage for our journey with a captivating virutal performance by the Kukily AfroFeminist Arts Collective. As Xtræncestors from a future where black people live in abundance and pleasure, the collective invites us to explore our collective memory to envision a liberating future. This interactive session not only introduces the core spirit and guiding questions of the course but also provides a unique opportunity for participants to connect with one another, sharing dreams and intentions for the journey ahead.
[test] Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 1 + Postcards from a Progressive Present Copy
Postcards from a Progressive Present
In this interactive session we will travel in time to any given moment in the future we desire for our selves, our land and our people. We will achieve this by first grounding ourselves in our bodies and in space and then reflecting on a number of questions that progress us into the energy of our desired future. Questions like who is the freest version of myself, what is my vision of communal love, what does it feel like to exist in a space that is thriving in abundance. We will paint a picture of the highest versions of our selves living in the highest versions of our communities and invite our selves in to inhabit this space. From here we will write and send postcards with messages of hope, joy, encouragement and support to our selves and our loved ones living in the reality of here and now. In this way we become emissaries of hope, astronauts voyaging into the dream space and returning with the tools needed for us to bring it to fruition.
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 1
Dig.IT.all Kinship: Foundations of Digital Relations
Explore the profound connections we occasionally experience with strangers. What underlies these fleeting moments of kinship? Do they transcend physical spaces to manifest in digital realms? Can they be deliberately cultivated? We will delve into these questions and reflect on the role of digital platforms in shaping our connections, emphasizing the importance of holistic healing and liberation for people of Afrikan ancestry.
Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 1 + Foundations of Afrocentrism and Cultural Architecture
Foundations of Afrocentrism and Cultural Architecture
July 2, 2024
Delve into the roots of Afrocentric thought and explore and understand how culture shapes our understanding of the world. Learn about African and global black knowledge systems and the art of world-building, and how these frameworks can lay the groundwork for re-envisioning our realities. Key Lessons: ✳︎ Defining Cultural Architecture & World-Building Exploring ✳︎ Routes and Roots of Afrocentrism ✳︎ Identifying Your Role in the Renaissance
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 2 + Sobonfu, Keeper of the Rituals
Sobonfu, Keeper of the Rituals
November 23, 2023
Our collective study is grounded and inspired by the teachings of ancestor Sobonfu Somé. In this session, we will learn about her and her people — the Dagara tribe of West Africa. By reflecting on her life and legacy as the “the keeper of rituals”, we will explore our own names and roles in community.
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 2 + Life-affirming Infrastructures
Life-affirming Infrastructures
From the belly of compounding crises, this conversation invites us to reimagine the precedents of what we grow - from institutions that sustain our current condition, to infrastructures rooted in our collective more-than-human accountabilities. We will position our collective imaginings as propositional - not just a critique of what should be dismantled, but as an opening to sit with what we build, the tools we use and how we organise. Drawing from Amahra's work, together, we will reflect on the type of systems demonstrators that affirm life and illustrate possibilities otherwise, beginning with Grandad's house
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 2
Resounding Voices: Revolutionary Expressions in Art and Music
April 17, 2024
Through a vibrant examination of contemporary art and music, Siphokazi guides us through the distorted narratives of African women's lives in South Africa's history. Siphokazi will explain how art serves not only as a reflection of society that unveils the distortive lens through which African women's stories have been told, but also offers a vibrant canvas for redefining African womanhood.
[test] Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 2 + Life-affirming Infrastructures Copy
Life-affirming Infrastructures
From the belly of compounding crises, this conversation invites us to reimagine the precedents of what we grow - from institutions that sustain our current condition, to infrastructures rooted in our collective more-than-human accountabilities. We will position our collective imaginings as propositional - not just a critique of what should be dismantled, but as an opening to sit with what we build, the tools we use and how we organise. Drawing from Amahra's work, together, we will reflect on the type of systems demonstrators that affirm life and illustrate possibilities otherwise, beginning with Grandad's house
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 2
Cykofa Narration
Ayana introduces the "Cykofa Narration" methodology, blending digital elements with storytelling to represent non-linear time. Through the integration of language, technology, and ecology, discover how Ayana fosters a practice that recalls forgotten histories while envisioning alternative modes of existence and interspecies relationships.
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 3 + Intimacy as A Spiritual Practice
Intimacy as A Spiritual Practice
November 29, 2023
The embers of our metaphorical fire crackle and with them, we will share our ideas on intimacy which in turn will be enriched by the Dagara’s conception of intimacy. What is it ? How does it manifest itself ? What purpose does it serve ?
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 3 + Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
In this session, Jacquelyn will unveil the entanglement of design with the stronghold of whiteness, beckoning us to break free from its grasp and embark on a transformative quest of self-remembering. Through thoughtful inquiry into how design shapes our sense of self and society, we will re-imagine what is possible when we reclaim our right to be seen, heard and centred. Jacquelyn will invite us to reclaim design from the places where our histories, cultures and agency have been obscured. To craft liberating spaces and a world that embraces the vibrant hues of our authentic identities and fuels our wellbeing.
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 3
Pan-African Mythologies and the Matriarchal Spirit
April 17, 2024
Guided by Buki Fadipe, we delve into the heart of Afro-spiritual traditions, mythologies and archetypes, uncovering their profound influence on African-descendant and diasporic women's navigation of the world. Buki will uncover the rich tapestry of pan-African spiritual cosmologies, deeply rooted in matriarchal societies—both real and mythical—that once presided over social order and justice. Spotlighting the diverse breadth of feminine mythologies from the Mami Wata archetypes, the Siblys prophetesses of the classical world and the Àjé wielding cosmic mothers of the Yoruba tradition and beyond. This class will confront the colonial erasure and suppression that have obscured these powerful narratives. Examining the rise of patriarchal power and its lasting scars on the collective feminine psyche, including gender biases and the reshaping of socio-political dynamics.
[test] Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 3 + Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves Copy
Beyond Whiteness: Designing to Remember Ourselves
In this session, Jacquelyn will unveil the entanglement of design with the stronghold of whiteness, beckoning us to break free from its grasp and embark on a transformative quest of self-remembering. Through thoughtful inquiry into how design shapes our sense of self and society, we will re-imagine what is possible when we reclaim our right to be seen, heard and centred. Jacquelyn will invite us to reclaim design from the places where our histories, cultures and agency have been obscured. To craft liberating spaces and a world that embraces the vibrant hues of our authentic identities and fuels our wellbeing.
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 3
Algorithms, Power and Race
Professor Ezekiel Dixon-Roman delves into the intricate connections between technology, race, and decolonization, emphasizing the persisting colonial and racial biases in technological systems. It critiques the use of AI in reinforcing hierarchies, explores the need for decolonizing algorithms and promoting radical openness in technology development to disrupt dominant structures and embrace diverse perspectives within algorithmic governance.
Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 3 + Power and Cultural Confidence
Power and Cultural Confidence
July 9, 2024
Unpack the mechanisms of cultural dominance and how it shapes perceptions of African and diasporic peoples. Discover the power of counter-narratives, and grounding ourselves in indigenous wisdom, to shift perspectives and foster cross-cultural understanding. Key Lessons: Understanding Cultural Hegemony ✳︎ Developing Cultural Confidence ✳︎ Honing Your Glitch: Cultivating Your Unique Voice
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Lesson 4 + The Ash Circle of Intimacy: Conflict Resolution as Ceremony
The Ash Circle of Intimacy: Conflict Resolution as Ceremony
November 16, 2023
We will identify our types of relationship based on Dagara belief systems and learn about rituals that pacify the heart and serve as intention-setting tools for healthy and effective communication and conflict resolution.
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 4 + Imagining Otherwise: Countering Carceral Fictions with Abolitionist Realities
Imagining Otherwise: Countering Carceral Fictions with Abolitionist Realities
In a world deeply entrenched in systems of power and oppression, the relationship between design and power becomes a critical lens through which we can challenge and transform the status quo. This session invites participants to explore the intersections of design, power, and radical re-imagination in the context of a convergence of challenges such as mass incarceration, mass surveillance, municipal disinvestment, and poverty. Drawing from her groundbreaking body of work, "Making Room for Abolition," Lauren will demonstrate the power of design fiction in envisioning artifacts from worlds without police and prisons. By collectively shaping these imagined futures, we will advance our understanding of abolitionist realities and their transformative potential.
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 4
Humanity Beyond Binaries
April 24, 2024
In this class, Hakima Abbas collaborates with Afro-transfeminists Puma Camille and Maria Clara Araújo dos Passos to explore the intersections of Afro-trans femininity and the expansive scope of human identity beyond the gender binary. Together, they will delve into the nuanced experiences and contributions of Afro-trans individuals within feminist movements and broader society, shedding light on the significance of recognizing and honouring humanity in all its diversity.
Meeting Our Griots: Sobonfu Somé + Mythmaking and The Poetics of African Spirituality
Mythmaking and The Poetics of African Spirituality
On this journey of ancestral remembering and listening, we filled our medicine bag with stories that restore timeless wisdom on the sacredness of existence and on our infinite interconnectedness with all things alive: with spirit. In this final week, we are invited to bring our own twigs, branches and logs to the fireplace to revive its flames and to spell new myths on African spirituality rooted in care and collective dreaming.
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 5 + Approximating Realities: Shifting Power and Territories Through Fiction
Approximating Realities: Shifting Power and Territories Through Fiction
How can we use storytelling and worldbuilding to seek belonging for The Othered in fractured geographies and an increasingly elusive future? Through a process of mythmaking and digital worldbuilding, we can begin to conceive emancipatory futures and situated technocultures for Africa and her diaspora. Working outside the learned methods of formal architectural practice, Miriam’s process appropriates digital technologies and subverts myths and hegemonies in order to approximate realities that destabilize our dysfunctional present and allow us to consider multiplicities in worldviews and cosmologies.
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 5
Crafting Futures: African-Descendant Women as Architects of Change
May 1, 2024
In this class, we will reclaim memory and narrative, affirming the agency and impact of African-descendant women to societal transformation. Amina Doherty collaborates with Gesiye Souza-Okpofabri and Timiebi Souza-Okpofabri to explore compelling narratives and examples that illuminate the ingenuity, creativity, connections and transformative power African-descendant women hold in rewriting their stories and reshaping their communities.
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 5
human Rights & Digital Justice
Berhan introduces the intricate ties between digital kinship, rights, and justice in the African context and beyond. Explore the impacts of existing technology designs on these relationships and the existential challenges they present. Reflect upon the demands and responsibilities that principles of digital kinship place upon us concerning rights, justice, and connectivity. Consider how we can leverage digital platforms to challenge and overthrow systems that amplify inequality and marginalization.
Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 5 + Cultivating Afrocentric Sensibilities
Cultivating Afrocentric Sensibilities
July 16, 2024
Embark on a journey of self-discovery, exploring the richness of Afro-aesthetics and indigenous values. Learn to integrate these sensibilities into your creative expression, decision-making, and community engagement. Key Lessons: ✳︎ Living by Indigenous Values ✳︎ Embracing Afro-Aesthetics ✳︎ Sankofa Applied: Harnessing Ancestral Wisdom for Social Change
Designing Africa and the Diaspora + Lesson 6 + Beyond What is Known: Embracing Uncertainty and Redefining Value in an Ever-changing World
Beyond What is Known: Embracing Uncertainty and Redefining Value in an Ever-changing World
In this thought-provoking session, Nu Goteh, invites us to challenge the conventional notions of certainty and stability in traditional roles, careers, and identities. We often encounter societal expectations that prioritize stability as a threshold for security and change. However, Nu urges us to critically examine the limitations imposed by desires which have their roots in histories of colonialism, apartheid, and experiences systems of domination and insecurity. We will collectively question the assigned value and constraints associated with these paths and perceptions, recognizing how they may hinder our potential as world-builders, creators, disruptors, and shapeshifters. Through critical analysis of the tensions between tradition, stability and uncertainty, this session invites us to reflect on prevailing paradigms and uncover the transformative power of embracing uncertainty, our unique roles in the social change ecosystem, and diverse trajectories.
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 6
African Traditions of Sex and Sexualities
May 8, 2024
In class, Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah will introduce historical and cultural practices that have shaped African understandings of sexuality, highlighting the ways in which knowledge has traditionally been passed down through generations. Drawing from age-old rituals and practices, she will explore how these ancestral insights can inspire expansive models of feminine liberation and freedom today. This session offers a unique opportunity to reconnect with a more liberated and inclusive approach to discussing and embracing sexualities within African and Afro-diasporic communities.
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 6
Building Diasporic Connections
Delve deep into the evolution of relationships in the digital age. Explore how digital platforms have reshaped connections, enabling kinship-building among African and African diasporic communities. Additionally, understand how these platforms have been pivotal tools for political education and the pursuit of freedom in the African context.
Cultural Architectures: Building Afrocentric Realities + Lesson 6 + Towards Plurality: Expanding Afrocentric Influence Globally
Towards Plurality: Expanding Afrocentric Influence Globally
July 2, 2024
Explore how Afrocentric contributions enrich global landscapes. Examine the potential of Afrocentric perspectives to enrich global conversations and contribute to solving complex challenges. Understand the necessity of spreading those contributions more fairly across the world. This module tackles the universality of Afrocentric thought and its potential for building a more just and vibrant future for all. Key Lessons: ✳︎ Cosmological Equity ✳︎ AfroFuturism in Practice ✳︎ Global Impact of Afrocentric Perspectives
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 7
Writing Ourselves: The Power of Storytelling
May 15, 2024
Chika Unigwe, an acclaimed novelist and professor of creative writing, will discuss the power of storytelling in representing the multifaceted experiences of African-descendant women. Chika will illuminate how stories can confront crises, challenge societal perceptions, and ultimately, contribute to the reshaping of identities. Discover and harness the strength of your own stories, learning how storytelling can not only represent lived experiences and foster a deeper sense of self, but also express nuances and truths about the world around you.
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 7
Building an Afro-feminist Internet
Neema Iyer enlightens us about the intersection of feminism and futurism in the realms of data and technology. Gain insights into the concept of an AfroFeminist Internet and discover feminist strategies that push for a more inclusive, equitable, and just technological landscape, where technology acts as a beacon of fairness and joy.
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 8
Inscribed Identities: Exploring Body Markings and Expression in African Women's Lives
May 22, 2024
In this visually stunning exploration, Jessica Horn and Laurence Sessou will traverse the traditional and contemporary realms of tattooing and scarification, revealing the deep connections between body markings, heritage, and the ways African women assert agency over their bodies and stories. In a discussion about their project, ‘the temple of her skin' Jessica and Laurence will explore the cultural significance, personal narratives, and artistic beauty of tattooing and scarification, offering insights into an often under-explored aspect of African women's expression and identity.
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 8
Ethical Design
Christina Harrington draws upon her extensive research and expertise to present design as a potent tool for promoting ethically responsible technological interactions, such as with ethical AI. Learn about the significance of community-centered research and speculative co-design methods. Christina will also introduce "Black-Centered Design," a transformative approach that encompasses cultural imaginaries and design thinking. This session underscores the potential of design to widen technology access and empower marginalized communities, promoting a more equitable future
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 9
Unravelling Fear and African Feminist Imagination
May 22, 2024
Pumla Dineo Gqola, renowned Chair for African Feminist Imagination at Nelson Mandela University, will delve into the intricate layers of feminist thought, literature, and liberation. Drawing upon her extensive body of work, including the pivotal texts "A Renegade Called Simphiwe," "Reflecting Rogue: Inside the Mind of a Feminist," and "Female Fear Factory," Pumla will guide participants through a profound exploration of the ways in which fear has been manufactured and utilised as a tool to suppress and control women's bodies and freedoms across history and cultures.
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 9
Workshop: African Imagination and Technology Design
Aisha invites world builders, dreamers, life makers and visionaries to relish in the contributions of our ancestors to digital existence, explore new digital realms cultivated by our desires and co-create digital landscapes reflecting African cosmologies and Pan African worldviews. Working with Achille Mbembe's essay on African Imagination of A Borderless World we will claim our right and responsibility to imagine and craft digital worlds as liberated zones where Black folks are thriving, joyful, sovereign and free.
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 10
Fostering Wellness and Resilience in Women
May 29, 2024
Drawing on her experiences in fostering mental, emotional, spiritual, and communal well-being, April-Autumn will share strategies for nurturing resilience and empowerment among women and girls. This class aims to ignite women's potential, celebrate female resilience, and contribute to the creation of strong, empowered individuals capable of sustaining themselves and enriching those around them.
Digital Kinship: Redefining Relationality in the Digital Age + Lesson 10
Care & Community in Digital Interfaces
Annika introduces us to a vision of digital spaces that transcend traditional linear structures, promoting a paradigm rooted in collectivity, playful design, and care-oriented technology. The workshop aims to establish the profound idea of centering tenderness as a practical method in the creation and interaction with technology. It challenges participants to reimagine digital interfaces that are more fluid, organic, and nurturing, reinforcing the ideals of community and holistic care.
Restorying African-descendant Women and Social Change + Lesson 11
Re-creating Ourselves Workshop
May 29, 2024
Join Doriana Diaz in a transformative exploration of self through the art of collage. This workshop transcends traditional craft, inviting you into the process of "Re-creating Ourselves" through visual praxis and thematic storytelling. Learners will be invited to reflect on the lessons they’ve learned throughout the course, as well as their own experiences, learning about how engaging with archives and forming ritualistic practices can provoke reflection on self-identity, evolution, and help shape our understanding of ourselves and our journey through life.
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Tyrone Martinez-Black
seeking mutual edification in every encounter
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Sunshine Dlangamandla
Architect
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Victoria Ogoegbunam Okoye
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Nompumelelo Ncube
Visual Artist & Public Historian
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Linda Chastine
Community Organizer and Cultural Critic
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Grace Chigozie
QI Consultant & Project Manager | Passionate About Equity-Driven Innovation & Community Development | Foodie & Travel Enthusiast
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Christopher Stuart Johnson
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Veronica Brown-Comegys (she/her/ela)
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Ellen Manoushag Dingizian
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Emmanuella Sulemana Stevenson